Journal of Practical Ethics

The Journal of Practical Ethics is an open access journal in moral and political philosophy (and related areas), published by the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, located at the University of Oxford.

Our vision is to build an open access journal that will bring the best work in philosophy to bear on pressing issues of public, political or interdisciplinary interest. We believe that the ideas and arguments of many moral and political philosophers are of significant relevance to problems in contemporary life. Not only are these arguments of interest to a wide general public, but they are of relevance to many other academics, political and social leaders. However, there is less than optimal penetration of this philosophical work. It will aim to disseminate excellent research in practical and applied ethics to a broad, global audience comprised of both academic and non-academic readers, with high impact.

Every issue of the Journal of Practical Ethics is available online, free of charge. It is an invitation only, blind-peer-reviewed journal. It is entirely open access online, and print copies may be ordered at cost price via a print-on-demand service. Authors and reviewers are offered an honorarium. The Journal aims to bring the best in academic moral and political philosophy, applied to practical matters, to a broader student or interested public audience. It seeks to promote informed, rational debate, and is not tied to any one particular viewpoint. The Journal will present a range of views and conclusions within the analytic philosophy tradition. It is funded through the generous support of the Uehiro Foundation in Ethics and Education.

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Current Issue

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Journal of Practical Ethics

Current Issue: Volume 7 (3) December 2019
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Contents

 

The Duty to Remove Statues of Wrongdoers
Helen Frowe
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(3): 1-31

This paper argues that public statues of persons typically express a positive evaluative attitude towards the subject. It also argues that states have duties to repudiate their own historical wrongdoing, and to condemn other people’s serious wrongdoing. Both duties are incompatible with retaining public statues of people who perpetrated serious rights violations. Hence, a person’s being a serious rights violator is a sufficient condition for a state’s having a duty to remove a public statue of that person. I argue that this applies no less in the case of the ‘morally ambiguous’ wrongdoer, who both accomplishes significant goods and perpetrates serious rights violations. The duty to remove a statue is a defeasible duty: like most duties, it can be defeated by lesser-evil considerations. If removing a statue would, for example, spark a violent riot that would risk unjust harm to lots of people, the duty to remove could be outweighed by the duty not to foreseeably cause unjust harm. This would provide a lesser-evil justification for keeping the statue. But it matters that the duty to remove is outweighed, rather than negated, by these consequences. Unlike when a duty is negated, one still owes something in cases of outweighing. And it especially matters that it is outweighed by the predicted consequences of wrongful behaviour by others.

 

Kidney Sales and the Burden of Proof
Julian J. Koplin & Michael J. Selgelid
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(3): 32-53

Janet Radcliffe Richards’ The Ethics of Transplants outlines a novel framework for moral inquiry in practical contexts and applies it to the topic of paid living kidney donation. In doing so, Radcliffe Richards makes two key claims: that opponents of organ markets bear the burden of proof, and that this burden has not yet been satisfied. This paper raises four  elated objections to Radcliffe Richards’ methodological framework, focusing largely on how Radcliffe Richards uses this framework in her discussion of kidney sales. We conclude that Radcliffe Richards’ method of inquiry hinders our ability to answer the very question that it ought to help us resolve: What is there best reason to do, all things considered?

 

Not a Defence of Organ Markets
Janet Radcliffe Richards
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(3): 54-66

Selgelid and Koplin’s article ‘Kidney Sales and the Burden of Proof’ (K&S 2019) presents a series of detailed and persuasive arguments, intended to demolish my own arguments against the prohibition of organ selling. And perhaps they might succeed, if the case described by the authors were the one I actually make. However, notwithstanding the extensive quotations and the detailed explanations of the way I supposedly argue, this account of my position comprehensively mistakes both the conclusions I reach and the arguments I give for them.

Past Issues

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Journal of Practical Ethics 7(2)

On Relational Injustice: Could Colonialism Have Been Wrong Even if it Had Introduced More Benefits than Harms?
Brian Wong
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(2) Supplementary Student Issue, October 2019: 1-12

The Paradox of the Benefiting Samaritan
Miles Unterreiner
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(2) Supplementary Student Issue, October 2019: 13-33

Journal of Practical Ethics 7(1)

Being Good in a World of Need: Some Empirical Worries and an Uncomfortable Philosophical Possibility
Larry S. Temkin
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(1): 1-23

Each-We Dilemmas and Effective Altruism
Matthew Clark and Theron Pummer
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(1): 24-32

Being Good in a World of Uncertainty: A Reply to Temkin
Theodore M. Lechterman
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(1): 33-39

Medical Crowdfunding, Political Marginalization, and Government Responsiveness: A Reply to Larry Temkin
Alida Liberman
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(1): 40-48

Aid Scepticism and Effective Altruism
William MacAskill
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(1): 49-60

First Steps Towards an Ethics of Robots and Artificial Intelligence
John Tasioulas
Journal of Practical Ethics 7(1): 61-95

Journal of Practical Ethics (6)1

For Hierarchy in Animal Ethics
Shelly Kagan
Journal of Practical Ethics 6(1): 1-18

The Claims of Animals and the Needs of Strangers: Two Cases of Imperfect Right
Christine M. Korsgaard
Journal of Practical Ethics 6(1): 19-51

The Fundamental Problem of Philosophy: Its Point
Ingmar Persson
Journal of Practical Ethics 6(1): 52-68

Journal of Practical Ethics (5)2

The Neglected Harms of Beauty: Beyond Engaging Individuals
Heather Widdows
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 1-29

Why be Moral in a Virtual World?
John McMillan & Mike King
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 30-48

Population and Having Children Now
Jan Narveson
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 49-6

Is Sex With Robots Rape?
Romy Eskens
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 62-7

Prostitution: You Can’t Have Your Cake and Sell It
Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 77-8

The Ethics of Political Bots: Should We Allow Them For Personal Use?
Jonas Haeg
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 85-10

What Makes Discrimination Wrong?
Paul de Font-Reaulx
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 105-11

The Ethical Dilemma of Youth Politics
Andreas Masvie
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(2): 114-121

Journal of Practical Ethics 5(1)

Structural Injustice and the Place of Attachment 
Lea Ypi
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(1): 1-21

Accepting Collective Responsibility for the Future
Stephen M. Gardiner
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(1): 22-52

The Death Penalty Debate: Four Problems and New Philosophical Perspectives
Masaki Ichinose
Journal of Practical Ethics 5(1): 53-80

Journal of Practical Ethics 4(2)

The Greatest Vice?
Hugh LaFollette
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(2), pp 1-24

Ignorance, Humility and Vice
Cecile Fabre
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(2), pp 25-30

Humanity’s Collective Ownership of the Earth and Immigration
Mathias Risse
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(2), pp 31-66

Twenty Questions
Peter Singer
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(2), pp 67-78

Necessity and Liability: On an Honour-Based Justification for Defensive Harming
Joseph Bowen
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(2), pp 79-93

Consistent Vegetarianism and the Suffering of Wild Animals
Thomas M. Sittler-Adamczewski
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(2), pp 94-102

Journal of Practical Ethics 4(1)

Dilemmas of Political Correctness
Dan Moller
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(1), pp 1-22

Offsetting Class Privilege
Holly Lawford-Smith
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(1), pp 23-51

Unjust Wars Worth Fighting For
Victor Tadros
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(1), pp 52-78

The Economics of Morality
Dillon Bowen
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(1), pp 80-103

Going Viral: Vaccines, Free Speech, and the Harm Principle
Miles Unterreiner
Journal of Practical Ethics 4(1), pp 104-120

Journal of Practical Ethics 3(2)

Less Blame, Less Crime? The Practical Implications of Moral Responsibility Skepticism
Neil Levy
Journal of Practical Ethics 3(2), pp 1-17

Common Morality, Human Rights, and Multiculturalism in Japanese and American Bioethics
Tom L. Beauchamp
Journal of Practical Ethics 3(2), pp 18-35

Should we Prohibit Breast Implants? Collective Moral Obligations in the Context of Harmful and Discriminatory Social Norms
Jessica Laimann
Journal of Practical Ethics 3(2), pp 37-60

How Should Vegans Live?
Xavier Cohen
Journal of Practical Ethics 3(2), pp 61-65

Journal of Practical Ethics 3(1)

Cost Effectiveness Analysis and Fairness
F. M. Kamm
Journal of Practical Ethics 3(1), pp 1-14

The Elements of Well-Being
Brad Hooker
Journal of Practical Ethics 3(1), pp 15-35

Motives to Assist and Reasons to Assist: the Case of Global Poverty
Simon Keller
Journal of Practical Ethics 3(1), pp 37-63

Journal of Practical Ethics 2(2)

How Theories of Well-Being Can Help Us Help
Valerie Tiberius
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(2), pp 1-19

What Can we Learn From Happiness Surveys?
Edward Skidelsky
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(2), pp 20-32

Indirect Discrimination Is Not Necessarily Unjust
Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(2), pp 33-57

Letter: Comment on “Associative Duties and the Ethics of Killing in War”
Jeff McMahan
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(2), pp 58-68

Letter: A Reply to McMahan
Seth Lazar
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(2), pp 69-71

Journal of Practical Ethics 2(1)

Church-State Separation, Healthcare Policy, and Religious Liberty
Robert Audi
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(1), pp 1-23

Taking Humour (Ethics) Seriously, But Not Too Seriously
David Benatar
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(1), pp 24-43

Only X%: The Problem of Sex Equality
Janet Radcliffe-Richards
Journal of Practical Ethics 2(1), pp 44-67

Journal of Practical Ethics 1(2)

The Morality of Reputation and the Judgment of Others
David S. Oderberg
Journal of Practical Ethics 1(2), pp 3-33

Moral Education in the Liberal State
Kyla Ebels-Duggan
Journal of Practical Ethics 1(2), pp 34-63

Motives and Markets in Health Care
Daniel Hausman
Journal of Practical Ethics 1(2), pp 64-84

Journal of Practical Ethics 1(1)

Introducing the Journal of Practical Ethics
Roger Crisp & Julian Savulescu
Journal of Practical Ethics 1(1), pp 1-2

Associative Duties and the Ethics of Killing in War
Seth Lazar
Journal of Practical Ethics 1(1), pp 3-48

Biotechnology, Justice and Health
Ruth Faden & Madison Powers
Journal of Practical Ethics 1(1), pp 49-61

Situationism and Agency
Alfred R. Mele & Joshua Shepherd
Journal of Practical Ethics 1(1), pp 62-83

Journal of Practical Ethics 6(2)

Seeing, Feeling, Doing: Mandatory Ultrasound Laws, Empathy and Abortion
Catherine Mills
Journal of Practical Ethics 6(2): 1-31

Termination of Pregnancy After Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT): Ethical Considerations
Tom Shakespeare & Richard Hull
Journal of Practical Ethics 6(2): 32-54

The Endless Umbilical Cord: Parental Obligation to Grown Children
Rivka Weinberg
Journal of Practical Ethics 6(2): 55-72

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